BRYAN OHNO GALLERY

VESA LEHTIMAKI

Vesa Lehtimäki received his Master of Arts from the University of Industrial Arts in 1998, and has worked in the magazine industry as a designer, art director and illustrator. In 2009 he purchased a Canon DSLR and started to point it to toys. Lehtimäki, draws inspiration from his life long exposure to the Star Wars saga. First seeing the movies in theaters when he was a child and later on rediscovering the films through his children’s toys. As a child he had dreamed to direct movies and with his photography he revisits this unfulfilled career path one tiny movie frame at a time. By adding smoke and small particles between the lens and the subject Lehtimäki creates a technique he calls “The Forced Atmospheric Perspective” a process the makers of The Lego Movie take notice. Lehtimäki is a member of #stuckinplastic.

The Thing With Old Machines, 2015

30” x 46” Edition of three

Metallic paper on plexi

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Last Ship to Rendezvous, 2015

30” x 46” Edition of three

metallic paper on plexi

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Pilot’s Dream, 2015

20” x 30” Edition of three

Metallic paper on plexi

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The Two Legged Camper, 2015

20” x 30” Edition of three

Metallic paper on plexi

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Breaking in the Untamed, 2015

30” x 30” Edition of three

Metallic paper on plexi

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March of the Walkers, 2015

10” x 24” Edition of three

Metallic paper on plexi

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The First Attempt, 2015

10” x 24” Edition of three

Metallic paper on plexi

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Helsingin Sanomat Newspaper Review

The BTL-A4 Y-wing starfighter sported two R200 ion jet engines, classic to some, trouble to others. The fighter was fast enough for bombing runs but with engines prone to overheating at full throttle, especially if near the end of their service. Landing the fighter to cool off the engines was just one of the ways to deal with the problem, finding a safe place to land was not always a given.

As the rebel troops fled their secret base on Hoth there was no time for pre-flight checks, it was a very fast operation. There is one known incident where an astromech unit had problems with manoeuvering in thick snow and, under heavy crossfire from Imperial ground assault troops, it's designated Y-wing fighter took off without it onboard. It was the last ride off Hoth.  R5-F7 was never recovered, it's whereabouts are unknown.  Oh, how I have missed photographing these!

TK-24/7 had never seen snow, he'd heard a lot about it from his uncle who was a snowtrooper and he always wanted to know what it would feel like to touch snow with bare hands. Then, out of the blue, while serving on the Star Destroyer Devastator, TK-24/7 got his chance. After the campaign on Hoth there was a brief maintenance phase for repairs and test flights, and during one such flight TK-24/7 quietly took his TIE fighter down, climbed out, took his glove off and touched the freezing snow for the first time in his life. It was magical! He even built a snow lantern, a thing he'd never actually seen, only heard of. It was the best day ever for TK-24/7. Until it was time to proceed with the flight... Climbing back in the TIE fighter without a ladder was something he had not thought about.  As the frigid deadly night of Hoth crept closer and the first gusts of the nocturnal winds blew snow off the TIE fighter's roof, TK-24/7 found out that snow lanters gave out no heat.

Little known fact: The AT-ST, although quite small, was designed for more than just simple attack operations. The cabin boasted rotating chairs that could be turned into compact bunk beds. A crew of two could easily be fitted for a few days' patrol missions. A crew of one would go for a full week.  The warm and surprisingly cozy cabin of the AT-ST was not that bad. With the deadly Hoth winds howling outside, after the service hours were full for the day, TK-24/7 parked the walker, took his armor off, made some dinner and spent another evening reading a book. Yeah, these missions were the best!  Actually, I was planning to build my Y-wing model but I sliced my thumb yesterday with an X-acto blade. It was (again) not that bad but enough to make changes to the plan. For this I did not need the thumb. 

This is one of my more troublesome photographs. I had a vision of how the tauntaun should gallop in the thick snow, I shot it twice and didn't get it right. I was never truly happy with what I had posted from the photoshoots in 2010 and 2011 (from which this frame is from).  I recently went thru the old photos of my "Lego on Hoth" -theme looking for images I could re-edit for square format for my Instagram account. Many of the people there apparently had not seen these old snowshots, so it was okay to recycle some of them for a new audience, so to speak. While going thru the images I found this unpublished rejected frame. It has a problem on the left (the snow spray looks bad), but when cropped for square the problem goes away nicely. Now, after three years, with colours tweaked, this feels pretty much perfect for me, this is how tauntauns gallop in thick snow. In Lego.


The sound of an approaching AT-AT walker was a weapon itself. The heavy feet pounding the ground sending recognizable tremors kilometres ahead... During the assault on Hoth many of the snowtroopers marching along the mighty walkers froze from the horror. Some were stepped on by the walkers while standing still on their path.

Little known fact: Princess Leia tried to free Han Solo from the clutches of Jabba the Hutt twice. The first time was not a success, Princess Leia realized very quickly Jabba the Hutt was not going to be ostri... ostracized from his posse just like that. They needed a different strategy.  I know, the pun is bad. Sorry.  Happy Star Wars day everyone!